Indonesia

Indonesia is the world’s largest archipelagic State, with roughly 18,000 islands encompassing the sixth-largest exclusive economic zone (EEZ) in the world. It is also the world’s fourth most populous nation with 40% of the population (roughly 100 million people) living near the coast. Indonesia  also has one of the highest levels of marine biodiversity and the most fertile fishing grounds in the world, and is the second-largest fish producer after China, however wild catch in Indonesia has plateaued in recent decades.

 Country context 

Indonesia is the world’s largest archipelagic State, with roughly 18,000 islands encompassing the sixth-largest exclusive economic zone (EEZ) in the world. It is also the world’s fourth most populous nation with 40% of the population (roughly 100 million people) living near the coast. 

A global hotspot and priority for conversation, Indonesia has one of the highest levels of marine biodiversity and the most fertile fishing grounds in the world.  Indonesia is the second-largest fish producer after China, however wild catch in Indonesia has plateaued in recent decades. In 2017, Indonesia’s capture fishery production reached approximately 6.7 million tonnes. Main fisheries in the country by volume in 2017 included skipjack tuna (460,000 Mt), other tuna species (290,000 Mt) and blue swimming crab (appx 240,000 Mt) fisheries. Indonesia catches approximately 16% of the world’s tuna supply.

In terms of livelihoods, wild capture fisheries employ approximately 2.7 million Indonesians. Additionally, over 1 million workers are involved in the processing and marketing of seafood products. In 2017, the total value of exported fishery commodities was USD 4 billion.  Most Indonesian fishers are small-scale fishers, with vessels under 10 gross tons (GT).  About 54% of national animal protein supply comes from fish and seafood. As one of the principal producers of seafood, Indonesia can play a significant role in shaping governance and best practice in global fisheries.

 Country Project Objetives

The GMC project in Indonesia will directly benefit people whose livelihoods depend directly on the two target fisheries: Tuna and Blue Swimming Crab.  The project will support the creation and implementation of a Sustainable Marine Commodity Platform (SMCP), or dialogue space for key stakeholders in each of the fisheries.  This Platform will provide a shared decision-making space for the private sector and government representatives in order to design, update and monitor a consensus-based sustainable fisheries roadmap to pursue Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) #14.  

Specifically, the GMC Project in Indonesia will:

  • Create and promote the institutionalization Sustainable Marine Commodity Platforms (SMCP) led by the Ministry of National Development Planning/ BAPPENAS.
  • Support the update and implementation of the Tuna and Blue Swimming Crab National Action Plans (NAPs) coordinated by Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries.
  • Support the implementation of FIPs to advance toward sustainable certification.
  • Facilitate the availability of data and information for credible sourcing of sustainable seafood and development planning for the Indonesian fisheries sector.

 Supported Fishery Improvement Projects (FIP)

In addition, the project will support the implementation of Fishery Improvement Projects (FIPs) for Yellowfin and Skipjack Tuna and Blue Swimming Crab fisheries.

Yellowfin Tuna Pole and Line FIP
The goal of this FIP is to transition Indonesian one-by-one tuna fisheries to Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) Full Assessment within 5-years.  To date, this FIP has accomplished several actions delineated in its work plan, and the GMC project will support the FIP by helping to develop the Harvest Strategy and Control Rules for Indonesian Archipelagic Waters, measures to minimise unwanted catch of and interactions with Endangered, Threatened and Protected species; mapping FAD usage and its impact to the habitat, and review of national and provincial regulations.
The Indonesia Yellowfin Tuna Pole and Line FIP is coordinated by AP2HI and IPNLF in partnership with the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries and MDPI.

Fishery Progress Profile: Indonesia Western and Central Pacific Ocean yellowfin tuna – pole & line  

Skipjack Tuna Pole and line FIP: 

This FIP is closely tied to the previous FIP, and the GMC project actions to support the FIP are the same. The Indonesia Skipjack Tuna Pole and Line FIP is coordinated by AP2HI and IPNLF in partnership with the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries and MDPI.

Fishery Progress Profile: Indonesia Western and Central Pacific Ocean skipjack tuna – pole & line  

Blue Swimming Crab Trap FIP: 

The goal of this FIP is to transition the Indonesia Blue Swimming Crab Fishery to MSC full assesment within the perscribed 3-years.  To date, this FIP has accomplished several actions delineated in its work plan, and the GMC project support focuses on the development of Harvest Strategy and Control Rules; measures to minimise capture of non-target species; stock enhancement and restocking of blue swimming crab; improve compliance and traceability; and establish a Co-Management mechanism for the fishery through the creation of the Platform dialogue roundtable.

The Indonesia Blue Swimming Crab FIP is coordinated by APRI in partnership with Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries.

Fishery Progress Profile:Indonesia blue swimming crab – gillnet/trap  

 Contact information

Jensi Sartin
National Project Coordinator
jensi.sartin@undp.org 

  Country partners